What are the 7 rules about taking career tests


Career tests refer to those lists of questions that we answer in order to find out what are our strong points, interests, aptitude and priorities which will help us in knowing which career we should pursue. Sometimes when there are a lot of career options available, it becomes difficult to choose what we want to do. Career tests help to find out more about ourselves and what career path we should follow. Richard Nelson Bolles talks about the seven rules of taking career tests:

Rule 1: There is no test that everyone loves:

If you don’t like the questions or they are not suitable in your situation, take another one

Rule 2: There is no one test that always gives better results than others:

Every test may give different suggestions and it may vary from person to person because we are all different

Rule 3: No test should necessarily be assumed to be accurate:

Some answers may be accurate but you should not rely on them to be completely accurate all the time

Rule 4: You should take several tests, rather than just one:

Instead of one, take several tests to get a better idea of what your priorities and talents are

Rule 5: Always let your intuition be your guide:

Your intuition is the biggest guide and you should not blindly depend on tests but take into account your intuition too

Rule 6: Don’t let tests make you forget that you are absolutely unique:

Just like our fingerprints are different, all of us are unique persons and hence we need to think of careers which will highlight our unique talents

Rule 7: You are never finished with a test until you’ve done some good hard thinking about yourself:

Besides you results, you will need to think about the results to get the final deduction

Category: Career Guidance

Comments (2)

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  1. Rule 8 should be “before you do ANY career test, always check the research / evidence base supporting it”.

    Most designers and administrators of career tests will happily explain what research underpins the test and how it was put together.

    If you choose a pychometrics based career test, there’ll be a “technical” manual showing how reliable the test is (if you do the test several times how confident can you be that you’ll get very similar results each time you take it?); also how valid the test is (when people who enjoy working in a particular career complete the test do they show strong enthusiasm for the test items said to be related to that career family?).

  2. Sorry – mis-spelling. I should have written “If you choose a PSYCHOMETRICS based career test” …

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